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20130114
20130114
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the debt ceiling, or exercise the responsibility that they have kept for themselves and raise the debt ceiling, because this is about paying the bills. this is not a complicated concept. you do not go out to dinner and then eat all you want and then leave without paying the check. if you do, you are breaking the law. congress should think about the same way the american people do. if congress wants to say maybe we should go to a more modest restaurant, that's fine. in order to curb our appetite, we're not going to pay the people who already provided the insurance, already front of the money. that is not showing any discipline. that is just not meeting obligations. you cannot do that. that is not a credible way to run the government. we cannot going from crisis to crisis when there is a path in front of us that require stability and compromise. that's how this goes. that is how this needs to work. >> thank you, mr. president. binding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. in previous aspects of american history, president reagan, president h. w. bush, president clinton
as my first term comes to an end. >> brown: the questions were dominated by the looming debt ceiling fight. the president sternly warned republicans not to balk at raising the nation's borrowing limit. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choose quickly because time is running short. >> brown: congress has until march to raise the debt ceiling and prevent a government default. most republicans have insisted that with the government facing another trillion dollar deficit this year, any increase in borrowing authority must be tied to cuts in spending. the president flatly disagreed. >> i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. so while i'm willing to compromise and find common ground over how to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the b
morgenson talks about mortgage lending. steve bell talks about the debt ceiling. then, the mission and scope of the bureau of all, tobacco, firearms, explosives. "washington journal," live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> next, "q&a." then, david -- david cameron takes questions at the house of commons. then a discussion on the guantanamo detention facility. >> the fundamental idea here is if you spend time in silicon valley, if you spend time in detroit, where the automobile industry is being rebuilt, if you spent time outside the beltway, you see that america has the potential to generate abundance for its own citizens and for the world. you spend time only inside the beltway, it looks like a zero sum game. it looks like a lose-lose. who will lose the most is the gist is the -- gist of the negotiation. water the lessons of the technology sector? what are the lessons that have come from the optimism in the technology sector? how can they give us some ideas that we can pass it a
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